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April 2011 Program Highlights
All programs highlighted air on Channel 13.1 unless noted.

Friday

Pictured: Thane House, first year teacher First Year Teachers
This documentary explores why 25% of all new teachers quit within their first four years. As public education faces ever-tightening budgets and stricter test standards, many teachers experience mounting pressures that eventually crush their enthusiasm and lead to burnout. This compelling program follows two first-year teachers for an entire school year, and chronicles their successes, failures, and challenges. It examines the many financial, societal and time pressures facing all educators, and reveals that even the best teachers may not escape "pink slips" at year’s end.
Friday, April 1 at 1 pm ET

Pictured: Alison Stewart and Jon Meacham Need to Know
This weekly series is a cross-media news and public affairs magazine that culls stories from the best of the week’s online reporting, culminating in a one-hour on-air broadcast every Friday night. The program features documentary-style reports, short features, studio-based interviews and more. NEED TO KNOW covers five primary news beats: the economy; the environment and energy; health; national security; and culture. Alison Stewart and Jon Meacham co-anchor.
Friday, April 1 at 8:30 pm ET

Pictured: Two woman firefighters Apache 8
This documentary tells the story of an all-women wildland firefighter crew from the White Mountain Apache Tribe that has been fighting fires in Arizona and throughout the U.S., for over 30 years. Four extraordinary women from different generations of the Apache 8 crew share their personal narratives with humor and tenderness. They speak of hardship and loss, family and community, and pride in being a firefighter from Fort Apache.
Friday, April 1 at 10 pm ET
Repeats 4/3 at 4 pm ET

Saturday

Pictured: Ingredients: garlic, shrimp, fish, herbs Great American Seafood Cook-Off
Fires blazed and seafood sizzled as New Orleans hosted the fifth annual Great American Seafood Cook-Off in August 2008. During the two-day competition, 15 chefs from 14 different states prepared their best dishes using the seafood indigenous to their state. Famed New Orleans chef John Besh, the winner of the 2004 competition and the 2006 James Beard Foundation's Best Chef of the Southeast, hosted the event. This special shows the most dramatic highlights from the event.
Saturday, April 2 at Noon ET
Repeats 4/27 at 5:30 pm ET

Pictured: Media Meet program logo Media Meet
“Charitable Giving”

Marquette Community Foundation Executive Director Carole Touchinski is our guest when we explore the importance of foundations and charitable groups as a resource for meeting community needs, the role of tax credits, and actions related to government spending affecting group assets and endowments.
Saturday, April 2 at 6:30 pm ET
Repeats 4/3 at 1:30 pm ET

Pictured: High School Bowl series logo High School Bowl
“Semi-finals: Marquette vs Escanaba; Houghton vs Negaunee”

After 45 matches, it’s down to just four teams. Join host G.G. Gordon for exciting semi-final action in the 33rd annual tournament of the “best and brightest” of area high school students, all leading up to the championship game, Saturday, April 9.
Saturday, April 2 at 8 pm ET

Pictured: Jimmy Cliff Austin City Limits
“Jimmy Cliff”

AUSTIN CITY LIMITS continues its longstanding tradition of showcasing the best of American music. This week, reggae legend Jimmy Cliff performs his greatest hits and songs from his LP Existence.
Saturday, April 2 at 11 pm ET

Sunday

Pictured: Two woman firefighters Apache 8
This documentary tells the story of an all-women wildland firefighter crew from the White Mountain Apache Tribe that has been fighting fires in Arizona and throughout the U.S., for over 30 years. Four extraordinary women from different generations of the Apache 8 crew share their personal narratives with humor and tenderness. They speak of hardship and loss, family and community, and pride in being a firefighter from Fort Apache.
Sunday, April 3 at 4 pm ET

Pictured: Civil War canon The Civil War
“The Cause - 1861”

On the 150th anniversary of the beginning of America’s Civil War, PBS will re-broadcast Ken Burns’s entire landmark 1990 series. Burns’s epic documentary brings to life America’s most destructive — and defining — conflict. The 8-part series is the saga of celebrated generals and ordinary soldiers, a heroic and transcendent president and a country that had to divide itself in two in order to become one. Beginning with an examination of slavery, this episode looks at the causes of the war and the burning questions of union and states' rights. Part 1 of 9.
Sunday, April 3 at 8 pm ET

Pictured: Robert E. Lee Robert E. Lee: American Experience
He is celebrated by handsome equestrian statues in countless cities and towns across the American South and by no less than five postage stamps issued by the government he fought against during the four bloodiest years in American history. Nearly a century and a half after his death, Robert E. Lee, the leading Confederate general of the American Civil War, remains a source of fascination and, for some, veneration. This film examines the life and reputation of the general, whose military successes made him the scourge of the Union and the hero of the Confederacy, and who was elevated to almost god-like status by his admirers after his death.
Sunday, April 3 at 10 pm ET

Pictured: Sun Studio Sessions logo Sun Studio Sessions
“The Walkmen”

This new series features today's best new touring artists performing live in the legendary Sun Studio in Memphis, Tennessee. In addition to a live musical performance, each artist will share personal stories behind their songs and music. Sun Studio is an international tourist destination and a designated National Historic Landmark for its unparalleled contributions to music culture for providing the first professional recording opportunities for blues legends like Howlin' Wolf, B.B. King and Rufus Thomas, as well as discovering music legends Elvis Presley, Johnny Cash, Jerry Lee Lewis, Carl Perkins and Roy Orbison, among many others. The historic studio serves as a charming backdrop for these live performances from today's rising young touring artists.
Sundays at Midnight ET, April 3, 17 & 24
This episode repeats 4/10 at 1 am ET

Monday

Pictured: Encampment of the 5th Vermont at Camp Griffin The Civil War
“A Very Bloody Affair - 1862/Forever Free - 1862”

1862 saw the birth of modern warfare and the transformation of Lincoln's war to preserve the Union into a war to emancipate the slaves. Episode two begins with the political infighting that threatened to swamp Lincoln's administration and then follows Union General George McClellan's ill-fated campaign on the Virginia peninsula. The episode follows the battle of ironclad ships, camp life and the beginning of the end of slavery. Ulysses S. Grant' s exploits come to a bloody resolution at the Battle of Shiloh. The episode ends with rumors of Europe's readiness to recognize the Confederacy. In the third episode, convinced by July 1862 that emancipation was now morally and militarily crucial to the future of the Union, Lincoln must wait for a victory to issue his proclamation. But there are no Union victories to be had, thanks to the brilliance of Confederate generals Stonewall Jackson and Robert E. Lee. With Lee's September 1862 invasion of Maryland, the bloodiest day of the war takes place on the banks of Antietam Creek, followed shortly by the brightest - the emancipation of the slaves. Parts 2 & 3 of 9.
Monday, April 4 at 8 pm ET

Pictured: Program title graphic Under the Radar Michigan
“Marquette's U.P. 200, Houghton Lake Tip-up Town”

Join host Tom Daldin, a proud resident of Michigan his whole life, for a brand new series that uncovers people, places, and things that make Michigan a great place to live. This week Tom takes us to the U.P. 200 sled dog race in Marquette, and Tip-up Town in Houghton Lake, Michigan's largest winter festival.
Monday, April 4 at 10:30 pm ET

Tuesday

Pictured: Civil War canon The Civil War
“Simply Murder - 1863/The Universe of Battle - 1863”

This episode begins with the nightmarish Union disaster at Fredericksburg and follows two clashes that spring: at Chancellorsville in May, where Lee wins his most brilliant victory but loses Stonewall Jackson; and at Vicksburg, where Grant is prevented from taking the city by siege. Also covered is the fierce northern opposition to Lincoln's Emancipation Proclamation, the miseries of regimental life and the increasing desperation of the Confederate home front. As the episode ends, Lee decides to invade the North again to draw Grant's forces away from Vicksburg. In the 5th episode, the Battle of Gettysburg was the turning point of the war. For three days, 150,000 fought to the death in the Pennsylvania countryside culminating in Pickett's legendary charge. This extended episode goes on to chronicle the fall of Vicksburg, the New York draft riots, the first use of black troops and the western battles at Chickamauga and Chattanooga. At the dedication of a new Union cemetery at Gettysburg, Abraham Lincoln struggles to put into words what is happening to his people. Parts 4 & 5 of 9.
Tuesday, April 5 at 8 pm ET

Pictured: Igor Savitsky Independent Lens
“The Desert of Forbidden Art”

The incredible true story of how one man, Igor Savitsky, saved a treasure trove of art worth millions of dollars by "hiding" it in a museum in the desert in Uzbekistan. A tireless collector of paintings that the Soviet government wanted destroyed, Savitsky traveled thousands of miles scheming, plotting, pleading, doing whatever it took to get his hands on the art he so passionately wanted to preserve.
Tuesday, April 5 at 10:30 pm ET

Wednesday

Pictured: provost Guard of the 107th Colored Infantry at Fort Corcoran, part of the defenses of Washington. The Civil War
“Valley of the Shadow of Death - 1864/Most Hollowed Ground - 1864”

This episode begins with a biographical comparison of Grant and Lee and then chronicles the extraordinary series of battles that pitted the two generals against each other from the wilderness to Petersburg in Virginia. With Grant and Lee finally deadlocked at Petersburg, the episode moves to the ghastly hospitals in both the North and South, and follows Sherman's Atlanta campaign through the mountains of northern Georgia. As the horrendous casualty lists increase, Lincoln's chances for re-election begin to dim and with them, the possibility of Union victory. In episode 7, the presidential campaign of 1864 set Abraham Lincoln against his old commanding general, George McClellan. The stakes are nothing less than the survival of the Union itself. Opinion in the North has turned strongly against Lincoln and the war, but 11th-hour Union victories at Mobile Bay, Atlanta and the Shenandoah Valley tilt the election to Lincoln, and the Confederacy's last hope for independence dies. In an ironic twist, Lee's Arlington mansion is turned into a Union military hospital and the estate becomes Arlington National Cemetery - the Union's most hallowed ground. Parts 6 & 7 of 9.
Wednesday, April 6 at 8 pm ET

Pictured: Program title graphic Under the Radar Michigan
“Frankenmuth Ice Festival, Hamtramck”

Join host Tom Daldin, a proud resident of Michigan his whole life, for a brand new series that uncovers people, places, and things that make Michigan a great place to live. This week Tom checks out the Frankenmuth Ice Festival, then explores the food, music and diversity that is Hamtramck.
Wednesday, April 6 at 10:30 pm ET

Thursday

Pictured: Program title graphic Colonial Williamsburg Fieldtrips
“Making History Live”

Take a trip back in time to experience life in colonial America. These interactive field trips take viewers to Williamsburg, Virginia via live satellite video transmission, phone and the Internet to interact with actors reenacting 18th century American life. This month: What makes history come alive? Take a behind-the-scenes look at how historical African American character portrayals are created for Colonial Williamsburg’s Historic Area. From research through performance, experienced museum interpreters share their techniques for bringing the past to life.
Thursday, April 7 at 1 pm ET

Pictured: Civil War canon The Civil War
“War Is All Hell - 1865/The Better Angels of Our Nature - 1865”

William Tecumseh Sherman's March to the Sea brings war to the heart of Georgia and the Carolinas and spells the end of the Confederacy. Following Lincoln's second inauguration, Petersburg and Richmond finally fall to Grant's army. Lee's tattered Army of Northern Virginia flees westward towards Appomattox, where the surrender of Lee to Grant takes place. The episode ends in Washington, DC, where John Wilkes Booth begins to dream of vengeance for the South. In the final episode, on April 14, five days afterLee's surrender at Appomattox, Lincoln is assassinated. After chronicling Lincoln's funeral, the episode recounts the final days of the war, the capture of John Wilkes Booth and the fates of the series' major figures. The series ends by considering the consequences and meaning of a war that transformed the country from a collection of states to the nation it is today. Parts 8 & 9 of 9.
Thursday, April 7 at 8 pm ET

Friday

Pictured: Young girl wearing a cap device for researching the brain Decoding Autism
In 2010, doctors will diagnose more children with an autism spectrum disorder than with childhood cancer, juvenile diabetes and pediatric AIDS combined. This special looks at the devastating neurodevelopmental disorder that leaves families heartbroken, vulnerable and desperate for answers. The documentary highlights the efforts underway in New Jersey and New York, Boston, Philadelphia, Louisville and Sacramento, where researchers hope to gain insights that may lead to prevention, new treatments and even a cure. Includes interviews with a number of families dealing with the challenges of raising children on the autism spectrum and features visits to schools specializing in educating children with autism.
Friday, April 8 at Noon ET
Repeats 4/10 at 4 pm ET

Pictured: Artists depiction of battle and flags America's Iliad: The Siege of Charleston
This powerful documentary is about one of the most pivotal and heroic military campaigns in history - the battle for Charleston, South Carolina during the American Civil War and the resultant swath of destruction and social upheaval it created for its citizens. It tells the stories of military leaders, civilian diarists, African Americans, slaves and free blacks on both sides, including the infantrymen of the now legendary 54th and 55th Massachusetts. This film explores the causes and examines the devastation that both North and South felt while battling for Charleston, South Carolina and all that it represented for the southern government and its people.
Friday, April 8 at 8:30 pm ET
Repeats 4/26 at 1 pm ET

Pictured: Alison Stewart and Jon Meacham Need to Know
This weekly series is a cross-media news and public affairs magazine that culls stories from the best of the week’s online reporting, culminating in a one-hour on-air broadcast every Friday night. The program features documentary-style reports, short features, studio-based interviews and more. NEED TO KNOW covers five primary news beats: the economy; the environment and energy; health; national security; and culture. Alison Stewart and Jon Meacham co-anchor.
Friday, April 8 at 11 pm ET

Saturday

Pictured: Pati Jinich Pati's Mexican Table
This new series brings authentic Mexican flavors, colors, textures and warmth into American kitchens. A former policy analyst focused on Latin American politics and history, Pati Jinich is a chef, cooking teacher, food writer and mother of three whose true passion lies in sharing the tastes of her childhood and culinary adventures in her native country. In each episode, Pati embarks upon an exciting and entertaining journey, where each dish serves as a point of departure into Mexico's rich history and culture.
Saturdays at Noon ET, begins April 9

Pictured: Media Meet program logo Media Meet
“Condition One: South Pole”

Filmmakers John Major and Frida Waara discuss their trip to the South Pole and the challenges and obstacles of the extremes created by cold, darkness, ice, and weather patterns at Antarctica’s McMurdo Station and Amundsen-Scott South Pole Station.
Saturday, April 9 at 6:30 pm ET
Repeats 4/10 at 1:30 pm ET

Pictured: High School Bowl series logo High School Bowl
“Championship”

After 47 matches it’s down to just two teams. Beginning last October, fifty schools from throughout the U.P. and northern Wisconsin played in this annual tournament of the “best and brightest” of our high school students. Watch the exciting action as the last two teams meet in the finale of the 33rd High School Bowl season. Then, in a special season re-cap, host G.G. Gordon reviews some of the best and most memorable moments of this year's tournament.
Saturday, April 9 at 8 pm ET

Pictured: Spoon Austin City Limits
“Spoon”

AUSTIN CITY LIMITS continues its longstanding tradition of showcasing the best of American music. This week, it's the best in indie rock with Spoon. Austin institution Spoon highlights its album Transference.
Saturday, April 9 at 11 pm ET

Sunday

Pictured: Dreamers Theater organization logo Dreamers Theater
This documentary follows a group of teens and young adults with a variety of developmental disabilities as they rehearse and stage an original musical that dramatizes the issues they face. The uplifting performance documentary intercuts real-life stories together with similar scenes from the play, as individuals with autism spectrum disorder, Down's Syndrome, Aspergers Syndrome and other high-functioning disorders or differences navigate the challenges of employment, transportation woes, housing, relationships and more.
Sunday, April 10 at 11 am ET

Pictured: Young girl wearing a cap device for researching the brain Decoding Autism
In 2010, doctors will diagnose more children with an autism spectrum disorder than with childhood cancer, juvenile diabetes and pediatric AIDS combined. This special looks at the devastating neurodevelopmental disorder that leaves families heartbroken, vulnerable and desperate for answers. The documentary highlights the efforts underway in New Jersey and New York, Boston, Philadelphia, Louisville and Sacramento, where researchers hope to gain insights that may lead to prevention, new treatments and even a cure. Includes interviews with a number of families dealing with the challenges of raising children on the autism spectrum and features visits to schools specializing in educating children with autism.
Sunday, April 10 at 4 pm ET

Pictured: Scene on the coast of Cuba Nature
“Cuba: The Accidental Eden”

This small island’s varied landscape, its location in the heart of the Caribbean and its longstanding place at the center of Cold War politics have all combined to preserve some of the richest and most unusual natural environments of the hemisphere.
Sunday, April 10 at 8 pm ET

Pictured: Jean Marsh as Rose Buck Masterpiece Classic
“Upstairs Downstairs”

The saga continues at 165 Eaton Place with new characters upstairs and down in a three-part sequel to the much-loved MASTERPIECE series from the 1970s. Set in 1936, the lives of masters and servants have never been so captivating. Jean Marsh returns as Rose with a stellar cast including Dame Eileen Atkins (“Cranford”), Keeley Hawes (MI-5), Ed Stoppard (“Any Human Heart”), Claire Foy (“Little Dorrit”) and Ellie Kendrick (“The Diary of Anne Frank”). Part 1 of 3.
Sundays at 9 pm ET, begins April 10

Pictured: Richard Alley, program host and author of the companion book, on the California coast, close to Big Sur. Earth: The Operators' Manual
An operators’ manual helps keep your car or computer running at peak performance. Earth science can do the same for the planet. Join geologist Richard Alley as he travels the world and presents an accurate, understandable and upbeat report on the interconnected stories of humans and fossil fuels, Earth’s climate history and our future energy options will leave you amazed at the beauty and bounty of the planet, inspired by human ingenuity, and optimistic about the future.
Sunday, April 10 at 10 pm ET

Pictured: A woodland gravesite Safeguarding Memory: Commemorating Jewish Mass Graves in Poland
Beneath the earth throughout Poland lie the mass graves of tens of thousands of Jewish victims of the Holocaust. Today a number of elderly Poles who witnessed these brutal murders are openly sharing their memories. This documentary tells a few of these stories through the eyes of some of the individuals working to uncover this information and provide a dignified commemoration of the deceased innocents.
Sunday, April 10 at 11 pm ET

Pictured: Saxophone player Big Band Blues: Motor City Blues & Boogie Woogie Festival
This program presents performances from a magical concert event where 22 musicians and an ecstatic audience were transported back to a time when big bands ruled the dance halls, punctuated by insightful commentary from the artists about the relationship between, blues, boogie woogie, jazz and swing music. You’ll have the best seats in the house - and the best spots on the dance floor!
Sunday, April 10 at Midnight ET

Monday

Pictured: Ronald Howard as Sherlock Holmes The Casebook of Sherlock Holmes
“Thistle Killer”

This classic 1954-55 made-for-TV series stars Ronald Howard as Sherlock Holmes, H. Marion Crawford as Dr. Watson and Archie Duncan as Inspector Lestrade. In this episode: A London cabbie, who was dropped from the police force, posed as a Bobbie to murder his unsuspecting victims.
Monday, April 11 at 2 pm ET

Pictured: Five famine victims from Buzuluk, Russia The Great Famine: American Experience
When a devastating famine descended on Soviet Russia in 1921, it was the worst natural disaster in Europe since the Black Plague in the Middle Ages. Half a world away, Americans responded with a massive two-year relief campaign, championed by a new Secretary of Commerce, "the Great Humanitarian," Herbert Hoover. The nearly 300 American relief workers, "Hoover's boys," would be tested by a railroad system in disarray, a forbidding climate, and -- being among the first group of outsiders to break through Russia's isolation following the Bolshevik Revolution -- a ruthless government suspicious of their motives. By the summer of 1922, Americans were feeding nearly 11 million Soviet citizens a day in 19,000 kitchens. "The Great Famine" tells this story of America's engagement with a distant and desperate people -- an operation hailed for its efficiency, grit and generosity -- within the larger story of the Russian Revolution and the roots of the U.S.-Soviet rivalry that would dominate the second half of the 20th century.
Monday, April 11 at 9 pm ET

Pictured: Portrait of Alexander Hamilton. Rediscovering Alexander Hamilton
Hosted and written by author and journalist Richard Brookhiser, this documentary focuses on Hamilton’s character in six chronological segments. The film is not meant to be “the definitive chronology of Alexander Hamilton,” but rather a look at particular traits in his character — his strengths and weakness — how they were shaped into being, and how they played out within the new nation that was being created around him. To tell that story, the documentary combines traditional documentary techniques with Brookhiser’s exploration of Hamilton’s legacy and life in contemporary America.
Monday, April 11 at 10 pm ET

Tuesday

Pictured: Michigan quarter The Time is Now: Michigan's Best Investment
One out of three working-age Michigan adults – 1.7 million people – lack the basic skills or credentials to attain family-sustaining jobs and contribute to the state's economy. What if we could change that statistic dramatically? This special shows how, through early childhood investment, we can change our state. Delve into why the first five years of a child's life are exceptionally crucial and see how political and business leaders are working with early childhood advocates to give our youngest the best possible start -- and why investing now is the best economic decision our state leaders can make.
Tuesday, April 12 at 8 pm ET
Repeats 4/16 at 8 pm ET & 4/18 at Noon ET

Pictured: Samuel Harvill from Shiloh Christian high school gets his elbow taped during a game against the Euless Trinity Trojans at Cowboys Stadium in Dallas in 2010. Frontline
“Football High”

High school football has never had a higher profile, with nationally televised games, corporate sponsorships and minute-by-minute coverage on sports websites. In northwest Arkansas, FRONTLINE examines one ambitious high school team working its way towards national renown. With a superstar quarterback at the helm, tiny Shiloh Christian is striving to join the ranks of the country's best high school teams - teams whose workout schedules, practices and styles of play increasingly imitate the pros. But as high school players grow bigger, faster and stronger, there are growing concerns about the health and safety of these young players - with rising rates of concussions, career-ending injuries, even death. In Arkansas, FRONTLINE documents a tragic story of heatstroke injuries that reveal how weak regulation has created a crucial lack of athletic trainers at most high schools. It all raises a critical question: has the amped-up culture of high school football outrun necessary protections for the boys who play the game?
Tuesday, April 12 at 9 pm ET

Pictured: New and old photo of Fanya Gottesfeld Heller Teenage Witness: The Fanya Gottesfeld Heller Story
In 1941, the Nazis asserted their power by overrunning tiny villages throughout Eastern Europe. In the middle of the horror and chaos stood 15-year-old Fanya Gottesfeld (Heller). Only through the kindness of a Polish peasant did Fanya survive - hidden beneath a chicken coop with her parents and brother for two-and-a-half years. Based on her acclaimed memoir, Love In A World of Sorrow, this film presents a raw and emotional look at survival and the tenacity of the human spirit.
Tuesday, April 12 at 10 pm ET

Pictured: Jean-Michel Basquiat Independent Lens
“Jean-Michel Basquiat: The Radiant Child”

In his short career, Jean-Michel Basquiat was a wunderkind and a phenomenon. Discovered through for his graffiti art in the late 1970s on the Lower East Side, he sold his first painting to Deborah Harry for $200 and later became best friends with Andy Warhol. Director Tamra Davis pays homage to her friend in this documentary.
Tuesday, April 12 at 10 pm ET on 13.2HD Only

Wednesday

Pictured: Reinactment of man behind flames Secrets of the Dead
“Battle for the Bible”

This documentary explores the dramatic, violent and world-shaking story of the most famous and widely-read book in history -- the Bible in English. It's the tale of how, in the 15th and 16th centuries, a group of men set out on a new crusade: to bring the Scriptures to people in their own language for the very first time. In so doing, they would help launch a religious revolution that would ultimately change the course of history in England, America and beyond.
Wednesday, April 13 at 8 pm ET

Pictured: Jerusalem NOVA
“The Bible's Buried Secrets”

This two-hour special breaks exciting new ground in investigating the origins of the ancient Israelites, the evolution of their belief in one God and the creation of the Bible. For the first time, more than a century of literary detective work and decades of archeological excavation in the Holy Land will challenge viewers with provocative new insights, including that most Israelites worshiped pagan gods and many believed that God had a wife, who was venerated as an idol. A story of science, history and faith.
Wednesday, April 13 at 9 pm ET

Thursday

Pictured: Ask the Doctors program logo Ask the Doctors
“Digestive Health”

Area physicians visit the Public TV 13 studios to answer phoned-in questions from viewers during this live broadcast. This week’s guests are: To be announced. Call in your questions during the broadcast at 800-227-9668.
Thursday, April 14 at 8 pm ET
Repeats 4/15 at Noon ET

Pictured: The Auburndale project house, before. This Old House Hour
“Auburndale Project, Part 2”

Landscape contractor Roger Cook preps for the new foundation of the entry hall by removing the old overgrown and badly pruned yews. Out back, host Kevin O'Connor finds general contractor Tom Silva and lead paint specialist Ron Peik demolishing the sun porch within the limits of the new national EPA lead law that now affects all contractors working on houses from 1978 or earlier. In the second half of the hour, Tom helps a homeowner install balusters on his new staircase. Later, Roger helps a homeowner install a new stone footpath.
Thursday, April 14 at 10 pm ET

Friday

Pictured: Alison Stewart and Jon Meacham Need to Know
This weekly series is a cross-media news and public affairs magazine that culls stories from the best of the week’s online reporting, culminating in a one-hour on-air broadcast every Friday night. The program features documentary-style reports, short features, studio-based interviews and more. NEED TO KNOW covers five primary news beats: the economy; the environment and energy; health; national security; and culture. Alison Stewart and Jon Meacham co-anchor.
Friday, April 15 at 8:30 pm ET

Pictured: Marvin Kalb and guests on the set of The Kalb Report The Kalb Report
“All the News That's Fit to Print: Behind the Scenes at The New York Times”

This series explores the transformation of journalism and its impact on American democracy in a series of episodes produced at the National Press Club in Washington, D.C. Moderated by distinguished journalist and scholar Marvin Kalb, the programs offer one-on-one conversations and group discussions with industry leaders and icons of the profession on current topics at the intersection of press, politics and public policy. In this episode, New York Times Executive Editor Bill Keller and Washington Bureau Chief Dean Baquet take Marvin Kalb behind the headlines, bylines and paywalls of a 21st-century newsroom.
Friday, April 15 at 10 pm ET

Saturday

Pictured: Media Meet program logo Media Meet
“The Indigenous Environment”

Award-winning Native American environmental poet, novelist, and essayist Linda Hogan discusses environmental issues and indigenous perceptions.
Saturday, April 16 at 6:30 pm ET
Repeats 4/17 at 1:30 pm ET

Pictured: Michigan quarter The Time is Now: Michigan's Best Investment
One out of three working-age Michigan adults – 1.7 million people – lack the basic skills or credentials to attain family-sustaining jobs and contribute to the state's economy. What if we could change that statistic dramatically? This special shows how, through early childhood investment, we can change our state. Delve into why the first five years of a child's life are exceptionally crucial and see how political and business leaders are working with early childhood advocates to give our youngest the best possible start -- and why investing now is the best economic decision our state leaders can make.
Saturday, April 16 at 8 pm ET
Repeats 4/18 at Noon ET

Pictured: the Avett Brothers Austin City Limits
“Avett Brothers/Heartless Bastards”

AUSTIN CITY LIMITS continues its longstanding tradition of showcasing the best of American music. This week, rising roots rock kings the Avett Brothers perform songs from their latest album, I and Love and You. Ohio-to-Austin transplants Heartless Bastards follow with their classic rock 'n' roll.
Saturday, April 16 at 11 pm ET

Sunday

Pictured: Anneliese, Grover and Abigail
Shalom Sesame: It's Passover, Grover!

It's almost time to celebrate Passover and there is no horseradish to be found. Grover, Anneliese and Abigail put their heads together to track it down, but things get tricky when there is an Oofnik involved!
Sunday, April 17 at 4 pm ET

Pictured: A passover meal Burt Wolf: Taste of Freedom
“Passover”

The holiday that is observed by more American Jews than any other is Passover-the celebration that commemorates the liberation of the Jews from slavery in Egypt. On the first night of Passover, Jews hold a Seder which is a Hebrew word meaning "structured or in order". Families gather at the Seder meal and retell the story of Passover. Join Burt Wolf for a seder at Famous Sammy's Roumanian Steakhouse, take a tour of the Hassidic community in Crown Heights, Brooklyn, watch a master scribe at work, and learn how matzah is made.
Sunday, April 17 at 4:30 pm ET

Pictured: Male King Parrot Nature
“Survivors of the Firestorm”

The bushfires that tore through the Australian state of Victoria in February 2009 incinerated over a million acres of land. But burned and traumatized survivors tenderly nursed back to health at wildlife hospitals showed a remarkable ability to bounce back, and the environment an extraordinary capacity for healing.
Sunday, April 17 at 8 pm ET

Pictured: Jean Marsh as Rose Buck Masterpiece Classic
“Upstairs Downstairs, Part 2”

A German-Jewish refugee comes to 165 Eaton Place as a maid, prompting a range of reactions from upstairs and down. Her experiences culminate in a crisis tied to the fascist movement sweeping Britain. Jean Marsh, Dame Eileen Atkins, Keeley Hawes and Ed Stoppard star. Part 2 of 3.
Sunday, April 17 at 9 pm ET

Pictured: Liesbeth Gerritsen Forgiveness: A Time to Love and a Time to Hate
Helen Whitney explores the timely, nearly ubiquitous applications and limitations of the concept and practice of forgiveness through a compelling range of stories, from personal betrayal to global reconciliation after genocide. The 2-part series provides an intimate look into the spontaneous outpouring of forgiveness when coping with the worst life can bring. Part 1 of 2.
Sundays at 10 pm ET, April 17 & 24

Monday

Pictured: Ronald Howard as Sherlock Holmes The Casebook of Sherlock Holmes
“Split Ticket”

This classic 1954-55 made-for-TV series stars Ronald Howard as Sherlock Holmes, H. Marion Crawford as Dr. Watson and Archie Duncan as Inspector Lestrade. In this episode: The third party of a winning lottery ticket disappears and Holmes is asked to put his talents to the test. In this unique piece, we get the rare pleasure of seeing Holmes try his hand at some magic.
Monday, April 18 at 2 pm ET

Pictured: John Muir (portrayed by Howard Weamer) in Yosemite American Masters
“John Muir in the New World”

Nearly a century after his death, John Muir is remembered and revered as the father of the environmental movement and the founder of the Sierra Club. It was this Scottish American who believed that it was our responsibility as citizens to protect our natural surroundings. And, by example and by passion, he taught us how to care for our wilderness treasures.
Monday, April 18 at 9 pm ET

Pictured: Whale lookout point. Games of the North: Playing for Survival
For thousands of years, traditional Inuit sports have been vital for surviving the unforgiving Arctic. Acrobatic and explosive, these ancestral games evolved to strengthen mind, body and spirit within the community. Following four modern Inuit athletes reveals their unique relationship to the games as they compete across the North. As unprecedented change sweeps across their traditional lands, their stories illuminate the importance of the games today.
Monday, April 18 at 10:30 pm ET

Tuesday

Pictured: Henry Louis Gates Jr. Black in Latin America
“Haiti & The Dominican Republic: An Island Divided”

This new four-part series on the influence of African descent on Latin America, is the 11th documentary film from renowned Harvard scholar Henry Louis Gates Jr. Professor Gates' journey discovers, behind a shared legacy of colonialism and slavery, vivid stories and people marked by African roots. He introduces viewers to the faces and voices of the descendants of the Africans in six Latin-American countries, and shows the similarities and distinctions between these cultures and how the New-World manifestations are rooted in, but distinct from, their African antecedents. Part 1 of 4.
Tuesdays at 8 pm ET, begins April 19

Pictured: Frontline logo Frontline
“The Silence”

Frontline examines a little-known chapter of the Catholic Church sex abuse story: decades of abuse of Native Americans by priests and church workers in Alaska. The isolation of the villages and the absolute authority of the church over the Native population created an atmosphere where molestation could go unchecked and unreported. Also in this hour, a re-airing of Flying Cheaper, a January 2011 investigation into the outsourcing of major airline repair work to lower-cost independent maintenance operations in the U.S. and abroad. Closing the hour will be a news update on Flying Cheaper from correspondent Miles OBrien, as well as a follow-up on the story of Chinese artist and activist Ai Weiwei, who was taken into custody by government authorities days after FRONTLINEs March 29 profile of him, as part of a larger crackdown on artists, bloggers, and human-rights advocates.
Tuesday, April 19 at 9 pm ET

Pictured: Alexander Toradze Kicking the Notes the Toradze Way
This program is a performance documentary of political rebellion, passionate performance, and extraordinary master teaching. Alexander Toradze's dream of artistic freedom in America instigated his defection from the Soviet Union and the founding of a one-of-a-kind classical piano studio in South Bend, Indiana. Toradze's dramatic story is punctuated with stellar musical performances and locations from around the world - the United States, Italy, Georgia and Finland.
Tuesday, April 19 at 10 pm ET

Pictured: Vik Muniz at Jardim Gramacho Independent Lens
“Waste Land”

Brazilian artist Vik Muniz creates portraits of people using found materials from the places where they live and work. His Sugar Children series portrays the deprived children of Caribbean plantation workers using the sugar their parents harvest. We meet Muniz as he embarks on his next project, inspired by the trash pickers at the largest landfill on earth.
Tuesday, April 19 at 10 pm ET on 13.2HD Only

Wednesday

Pictured: Niall McCann, explorer/biologist; at Kamukuakua Falls- in the Mato Grosso, Brazil; sacred to the Bakairi Indians, the waterfall is one of the signposts for Colonel Percy Fawcett’s Lost City of Z. Secrets of the Dead
“Lost in the Amazon”

A modern day quest to find the truth behind one of exploration's greatest mysteries: What happened to famed adventurer Col. Percy Fawcett who went looking for a city of gold — the Lost City of "Z" — in the Amazon in 1925 and disappeared in the jungles of Brazil forever? This program unravels the truth of what really happened to Fawcett, and shares surprising finds that are causing experts to re-think the image of a pristine uninhabited Amazon rainforest: a place that before Columbus, may have had large populations living in sophisticated towns and cities.
Wednesday, April 20 at 8 pm ET

Pictured: Cranes move parts of the AP-1000 nuclear power plant at a construction site in Sanmen, China. NOVA
“Power Surge”

Can emerging technology defeat global warming? The United States has invested tens of billions of dollars in clean energy projects as our leaders try to save our crumbling economy and our poisoned planet in one bold, green stroke. Are we finally on the brink of a green-energy POWER SURGE, or is it all a case of too little, too late? From solar panel factories in China to a carbon capture and storage facility in the Sahara desert to massive wind and solar installations in the United States, NOVA travels the globe to reveal the surprising technologies that just might turn back the clock on climate change. NOVA will focus on the latest and greatest innovations, including everything from artificial trees to green reboots of familiar technologies like coal and nuclear energy. Can our technology, which helped create this problem, now solve it?
Wednesday, April 20 at 9 pm ET

Pictured: A silver sky over the waters of San Francisco Bay. Saving the Bay
“Marvel of Nature”

San Francisco Bay is the largest estuary on the Pacific Coast of both North and South America, but it is also the most invaded aquatic ecosystem in North America. Narrated by Robert Redford, the award-winning 4-part documentary explores how the Bay was almost lost to landfill schemes ranging from the daring to the deranged, and celebrates the more recent restoration and expansion of this once threatened treasure. "Marvel of Nature" is part 1 of 4.
Wednesdays at 10 pm ET, begins April 20

Thursday

Pictured: Ask the Lawyers program logo Ask the Lawyers
Area attorneys visit the Public TV 13 studios to answer phoned-in questions from viewers during this live broadcast. This week’s guests are: To be announced. Call in your questions during the broadcast at 800-227-9668.
Thursday, April 21 at 8 pm ET
Repeats 4/22 at Noon ET

Pictured: The Auburndale project house, before. This Old House Hour
“Auburndale Project, Part 3”

The morning starts with the arrival of a 17-foot-long steel beam that weighs 900 pounds. It will carry the load of the house over the 16-foot opening that was made in the rear foundation wall. Because the site is so hard to access, general contractor Tom Silva uses a crane to lift it up and over the house and place it carefully on a temporary wall near the installation site. In the second half of the hour, Tom helps a homeowner find additional storage space by creating a new doorway into an unused attic.
Thursday, April 21 at 10 pm ET

Friday

Pictured: Goldman Prize winners Global Focus VII: The New Environmentalists
This the latest installment of the Emmy award winning series featuring portraits of six passionate and dedicated activists. They are true environmental heroes who have placed themselves squarely in harm’s way to battle intimidating adversaries, while often creating partnerships with unlikely allies. The New Environmentalists share a common goal, safeguarding the Earth’s natural resources from exploitation and pollution, while fighting for environmental justice in their communities.
Friday, April 22 at 5 pm ET
Repeats 4/27 at 3 pm ET

Pictured: Plastic shopping bag stuck in a tree Bag It
Is your life too plastic? In this touching and often flat-out-funny film, we follow "everyman" Jeb Berrier as he embarks on a global tour to unravel the complexities of our plastic world.
Friday, April 22 at 8:30 pm ET
Repeats 4/25 at 2:30 pm ET

Pictured: Alison Stewart and Jon Meacham Need to Know
This weekly series is a cross-media news and public affairs magazine that culls stories from the best of the week’s online reporting, culminating in a one-hour on-air broadcast every Friday night. The program features documentary-style reports, short features, studio-based interviews and more. NEED TO KNOW covers five primary news beats: the economy; the environment and energy; health; national security; and culture. Alison Stewart and Jon Meacham co-anchor.
Friday, April 22 at 10 pm ET

Saturday

Pictured: Media Meet program logo Media Meet
“NMU Rural Development Center”

Northern Michigan University's newly launched 'Center for Rural Community and Economic Development' will combine research, education and special expertise to assist public, private and non-profit sector operations in the Upper Peninsula and Northeastern Wisconsin. Guests discuss the origin, structure and goals of the center.
Saturday, April 23 at 6:30 pm ET
Repeats 4/24 at 1:30 pm ET

Pictured: program title graphic Beyond The Light Switch
A decade into the 21st Century and America already faces a challenge equal to the mobilization of World War Two...the complete transformation of our entire electrical infrastructure. So what is the right way forward? Coal? Natural gas? Renewables? Nuclear? Or a super grid? Which gives us the most bang for our buck? Which path achieves all our goals while creating jobs and gaining a measure of energy security? This 2-part series explores the available alternatives.
Saturdays, April 23 & 30 at 8 pm ET
Parts 1 & 2 also air 4/29 at 1 pm ET

Pictured: My Morning Jacket Austin City Limits
“My Morning Jacket”

AUSTIN CITY LIMITS continues its longstanding tradition of showcasing the best of American music. This week, Kentucky's indie rock heroes My Morning Jacket return to the ACL stage to showcase their latest acclaimed album Evil Urges.
Saturday, April 23 at 11 pm ET

Sunday

Pictured: Program title graphic Bloom: The Plight of Lake Champlain
This documentary explores the health of the 6th largest lake in the United States, and the future of the watershed communities of Vermont, New York, and Quebec that surround its waters. This is a story emblematic of lake basins nation- and worldwide that are in a downward spiral of eutrophication, the fertilization of our freshwater systems from a human economy out of balance with its sustaining ecosystem. The blue-green algae blooms in Lake Champlain are the most visible symptom of a lake in decline, and the end point of a failing dairy industry, ill-planned development, and aging wastewater treatment systems.
Sunday, April 24 at 4 pm ET
Repeats 4/27 at 2:30 pm ET

Pictured: Last Supper painting Burt Wolf: Taste of Freedom
“Easter”

Of all the holidays and celebrations in the Christian calendar, none is more directly involved with the taste of freedom than Easter. The theme of Easter is liberation -liberation from time, liberation from sin and liberation from death. Spend a half hour with Burt Wolf and discover how a rabbit jumped into the moon, learn the intricate egg decorating tradition from the Ukraine, inspect the ultimate Easter eggs created for the Czars of Russia, and take a walk down Fifth Avenue on Easter Sunday.
Sunday, April 24 at 4:30 pm ET

Pictured: Cloud canters Nature
“Cloud: Challenge of the Stallions”

The returning saga of Cloud, the wild, white stallion finds us back in the Arrowhead Mountains of Montana. Cloud is now a confident band stallion in his prime. As he rules the mountains, gathering mares and expanding his reign, the story turns to his two sons. Bolder is his by birth -- beautiful and golden, the success of his father and grandfather flowing in his veins. Flint, sired by another stallion, is the colt Cloud raised. Now, Bolder has gathered some mares of his own while Flint has joined a group of bachelor stallions, young guns roaming the mountains. Who will rise to challenge the mighty Cloud? Will nature or nurture produce the next great stallion of the Arrowheads?
Sunday, April 24 at 8 pm ET

Pictured: Jean Marsh as Rose Buck Masterpiece Classic
“Upstairs Downstairs, Part 3”

As 1936 comes to a close, 165 Eaton Place is in turmoil: the king is about to abdicate, Agnes (Keeley Hawes) is about to give birth, Persie (Claire Foy) toys with fascism and Sir Hallam (Ed Stoppard) makes a shocking discovery about his past. Jean Marsh and Dame Eileen Atkins also star. Part 3 of 3.
Sunday, April 24 at 9 pm ET

Pictured: Liesbeth Gerritsen Forgiveness: A Time to Love and a Time to Hate
Helen Whitney explores the timely, nearly ubiquitous applications and limitations of the concept and practice of forgiveness through a compelling range of stories, from personal betrayal to global reconciliation after genocide. The 2-part series provides an intimate look into the spontaneous outpouring of forgiveness when coping with the worst life can bring. Part 2 of 2.
Sunday, April 24 at 10 pm ET

Monday

Pictured: A desert wetland Desert Oasis - Creating a Wetlands Park in Las Vegas
A documentary film portrait of the last, significant open space left in Las Vegas, Nevada - and the community members who sought to protect it by turning it into a Wetlands Park. The film shows how forward thinking communities can collaborate to keep nature available in their urban environment; and how the elemental connection between people and nearby nature benefits a community in return. Desert Oasis is a testimony to the value and beauty of these desert wetlands and the community who refused to let this special place slip through their hands.
Monday, April 25 at Noon ET

Pictured: Ronald Howard as Sherlock Holmes The Casebook of Sherlock Holmes
“Diamond Tooth”

This classic 1954-55 made-for-TV series stars Ronald Howard as Sherlock Holmes, H. Marion Crawford as Dr. Watson and Archie Duncan as Inspector Lestrade. In this episode: Sherlock Holmes must solve London's most celebrated murder mystery.
Monday, April 25 at 2 pm ET

Pictured: Plastic shopping bag stuck in a tree
Bag It

Is your life too plastic? In this touching and often flat-out-funny film, we follow "everyman" Jeb Berrier as he embarks on a global tour to unravel the complexities of our plastic world.
Monday, April 25 at 2:30 pm ET

Pictured: Riot gang with cops Stonewall Uprising: American Experience
This documentary explores the dramatic event that launched a worldwide rights movement. Told by those who took part, from drag queens and street hustlers to police detectives, journalists and a former mayor of New York, and featuring a rich trove of archival footage, this film revisits a time when homosexual acts were illegal throughout America, and homosexuality itself was seen as a form of mental illness. Hunted and often entrapped by undercover police in their hometowns, gays from around the U.S. began fleeing to New York in search of a sanctuary. Hounded there still by an aggressive police force, they found refuge in a Mafia-run gay bar in Greenwich Village, the Stonewall Inn. When police raided Stonewall on June 28, 1969, gay men and women did something they had not done before: they fought back. As the streets of New York erupted into violent protests and street demonstrations, the collective anger announced that the gay rights movement had arrived.
Monday, April 25 at 9 pm ET

Pictured: Program title graphic Under the Radar Michigan
“Lansing, Wyandotte”

Join host Tom Daldin, a proud resident of Michigan his whole life, for a brand new series that uncovers people, places, and things that make Michigan a great place to live. This week, Tom heads back to uncover more hidden treasures in our State Capitol and then heads down to explore wonderful Wyandotte.
Monday, April 25 at 10:30 pm ET
Repeats 4/26 at 3 pm ET

Tuesday

Pictured: Artists depiction of battle and flags America's Iliad: The Siege of Charleston
This powerful documentary is about one of the most pivotal and heroic military campaigns in history - the battle for Charleston, South Carolina during the American Civil War and the resultant swath of destruction and social upheaval it created for its citizens. It tells the stories of military leaders, civilian diarists, African Americans, slaves and free blacks on both sides, including the infantrymen of the now legendary 54th and 55th Massachusetts. This film explores the causes and examines the devastation that both North and South felt while battling for Charleston, South Carolina and all that it represented for the southern government and its people.
Tuesday, April 26 at 1 pm ET

Pictured: Program title graphic Under the Radar Michigan
“Lansing, Wyandotte”

Join host Tom Daldin, a proud resident of Michigan his whole life, for a brand new series that uncovers people, places, and things that make Michigan a great place to live. This week, Tom heads back to uncover more hidden treasures in our State Capitol and then heads down to explore wonderful Wyandotte.
Tuesday, April 26 at 3 pm ET

Pictured: Henry Louis Gates Jr. Black in Latin America
“Cuba: The Next Revolution”

In Cuba, Professor Gates finds out how the culture, religion, politics and music of this island are inextricably linked to the huge amount of slave labor imported to produce its enormously profitable 19th century sugar industry, and how race and racism have fared since Fidel Castro's Communist revolution in 1959. Part 2 of 4.
Tuesdays at 8 pm ET

Pictured: Coroner's van Frontline
“Post Mortem”

Every day nearly 7,000 people die in America. And when these deaths happen suddenly, or under suspicious circumstances, we assume there will be a thorough investigation, just like we see on CSI. But the reality is very different. In over 2,000 counties across America, elected coroners, many with no medical or scientific background, are in charge of death investigations. Nationwide there is a severe shortage of competent forensic pathologists to do autopsies. The rate of autopsies -- the gold standard of death investigation -- has plummeted over the decades from 50 percent of those who die to less than six percent. As a result, not only do murderers go free and innocent people go to jail, but the crisis in death investigation in America is also a threat to public health. FRONTLINE correspondent Lowell Bergman reports the results of a joint investigation with ProPublica, NPR, and the Investigative Reporting Program at UC Berkeley.
Tuesday, April 26 at 9 pm ET

Pictured: Jazz legend Ramsey Lewis performs Proclamation of Hope
Legendary Grammy-winning pianist and composer Ramsey Lewis wrote Proclamation of Hope to commemorate Abraham Lincoln’s 200th birthday and reflect on the significant events that inspired the life of our 16th President. Performed by a 21-piece orchestra, including Lewis, and vocalist Dee Alexander, the score is organized in eight movements that draw upon jazz, gospel, classical and blues. Each movement was inspired by an actual historical event from or impacted by Lincoln’s life and vision for America. This performance was recorded at the Kennedy Center in Washington D.C. on November 14, 2010.
Tuesday, April 26 at 10 pm ET
Repeats 4/28 at 1 pm ET

Pictured: Mark Hogancamp (pictured) and his alter ego Independent Lens
“Marwencol”

After being beaten into a coma, Mark Hogancamp is left brain damaged and traumatized. He devises his own brand of therapy by constructing a 1/6th-scale World War II-era town in his backyard and weaving complex storylines around his characters. Through Marwencol, Mark embarks on a long journey back into the real world, both physically and emotionally.
Tuesday, April 26 at 10 pm ET on 13.2HD Only

Wednesday

Pictured: The three subjects from WHIZ KIDS, Harmain Khan, Ana Cisneros, and Kelydra Welcker at San Francisco's Herbst Theatre for a benefit screening of the film. (Courtesy San Francisco Exploratorium) Whiz Kids
At a time when American teens lag far behind other countries in math and science, this coming-of-age documentary tells the story of three remarkably different yet equally passionate 17-year-old scientists who vie to compete in the nation's oldest, most prestigious science competition. Win or lose, these 'whiz kids' raise questions about class, courage, personal sacrifice, success and failure, and in the process, learn as much about themselves as they do about science.
Wednesday, April 27 at 1 pm ET

Pictured: Program title graphic Bloom: The Plight of Lake Champlain
This documentary explores the health of the 6th largest lake in the United States, and the future of the watershed communities of Vermont, New York, and Quebec that surround its waters. This is a story emblematic of lake basins nation- and worldwide that are in a downward spiral of eutrophication, the fertilization of our freshwater systems from a human economy out of balance with its sustaining ecosystem. The blue-green algae blooms in Lake Champlain are the most visible symptom of a lake in decline, and the end point of a failing dairy industry, ill-planned development, and aging wastewater treatment systems.
Wednesday, April 27 at 2:30 pm ET

Pictured: Goldman Prize winners Global Focus VII: The New Environmentalists
This the latest installment of the Emmy award winning series featuring portraits of six passionate and dedicated activists. They are true environmental heroes who have placed themselves squarely in harm’s way to battle intimidating adversaries, while often creating partnerships with unlikely allies. The New Environmentalists share a common goal, safeguarding the Earth’s natural resources from exploitation and pollution, while fighting for environmental justice in their communities.
Wednesday, April 27 at 3 pm ET

Pictured: Ingredients: garlic, shrimp, fish, herbs Great American Seafood Cook-Off
Fires blazed and seafood sizzled as New Orleans hosted the fifth annual Great American Seafood Cook-Off in August 2008. During the two-day competition, 15 chefs from 14 different states prepared their best dishes using the seafood indigenous to their state. Famed New Orleans chef John Besh, the winner of the 2004 competition and the 2006 James Beard Foundation's Best Chef of the Southeast, hosted the event. This special shows the most dramatic highlights from the event.
Wednesday, April 27 at 5:30 pm ET

Pictured: Actors portray Rudolph Vrba and Alfred Wetzler Secrets of the Dead
“Escape from Auschwitz”

The truth about the Auschwitz death camp was one of the most closely guarded secrets of the Third Reich. Prisoners who tried to escape were executed in public as an example to other inmates, and very few ever made it out alive. This documentary tells the story of two young Slovak Jews, Rudolph Vrba and Alfred Wetzler, who managed to escape by hiding in a woodpile for three days, then fleeing across enemy territory, determined to tell the world about the atrocities being committed by the Nazis at the camp.
Wednesday, April 27 at 8 pm ET

Pictured: Lupine flower blooms in the ashes of Mount St. Helens. NOVA
“Mt. St. Helens Back from the Dead”

When Mount St. Helens erupted in 1980, every living thing in the blast zone was buried beneath 300 feet of avalanche debris, covered with steaming mud and, finally, topped with a superheated layer of frothy rock from deep within the earth. It seemed as though Mount St. Helens might remain a wasteland forever. When biologist Charlie Crisafulli first flew over the disaster zone, finding no sign of life, little did he realize that his own life would be forever changed. Crisafulli has remained at the site for 27 years, documenting the dramatic return of plant and animal life to the barren landscape and pioneering a new understanding of the interaction between geologic forces and the life surrounding the mountain. NOVA brings viewers on a journey of a landscape brought back from the dead.
Wednesday, April 27 at 9 pm ET

Pictured: A silver sky over the waters of San Francisco Bay. Saving the Bay
“Harbor of Harbors”

The second hour of the series follows San Francisco’s “rapid monstrous maturity” into a major metropolis following the California Gold Rush (1849-1906). Establishing the infrastructure to support the instant city meant radical change for San Francisco Bay. By the century’s end, San Francisco Bay was the center of a broad economic empire on the Pacific. Part 2 of 4.
Wednesday, April 27 at 10 pm ET

Thursday

Pictured: Jazz legend Ramsey Lewis performs Proclamation of Hope
Legendary Grammy-winning pianist and composer Ramsey Lewis wrote Proclamation of Hope to commemorate Abraham Lincoln’s 200th birthday and reflect on the significant events that inspired the life of our 16th President. Performed by a 21-piece orchestra, including Lewis, and vocalist Dee Alexander, the score is organized in eight movements that draw upon jazz, gospel, classical and blues. Each movement was inspired by an actual historical event from or impacted by Lincoln’s life and vision for America. This performance was recorded at the Kennedy Center in Washington D.C. on November 14, 2010.
Thursday, April 28 at 1 pm ET

Pictured: Indian Paintbrush Wildflowers/Seeds of History
Discover the facts and legends behind the wildflowers that captivate us every spring, and go beyond the pretty faces to explore how wildflowers impact our food chain and their symbiosis to a healthy economy, wildlife, and ecological security. Interviews include horticulturists and botanists from the Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center, Matt Turner (author of Remarkable Plants of Texas), and tales from Luci Johnson and Lady Bird Johnson’s granddaughter Jennifer Robb. Asleep at the Wheel’s Ray Benson narrates.
Thursday, April 28 at 2:30 pm ET

Pictured: Ask the Doctors program logo Ask the Doctors
“Men’s Health”

Area physicians visit the Public TV 13 studios to answer phoned-in questions from viewers during this live broadcast. This week’s guests are: To be announced. Call in your questions during the broadcast at 800-227-9668.
Thursday, April 28 at 8 pm ET
Repeats 4/29 at Noon ET

Pictured: The Auburndale project house, before. This Old House Hour
“Auburndale Project, Part 4”

Host Kevin O'Connor arrives to find most of the demolition complete, and the house entirely opened up. General contractor Tom Silva shows him the progress and then they get to work taking the dip out of the old kitchen floor by working from below, down in the basement. In the second half of the hour, Tom helps a homeowner repair a rotted windowsill. Then, Richard helps a homeowner install an outdoor faucet.
Thursday, April 28 at 10 pm ET

Friday

Pictured: program title graphic Beyond The Light Switch
A decade into the 21st Century and America already faces a challenge equal to the mobilization of World War Two...the complete transformation of our entire electrical infrastructure. So what is the right way forward? Coal? Natural gas? Renewables? Nuclear? Or a super grid? Which gives us the most bang for our buck? Which path achieves all our goals while creating jobs and gaining a measure of energy security? This 2-part series explores the available alternatives.
Friday, April 29 at 1 pm ET & 2 pm ET

Pictured: Older woman in the driver's seat of a car. Conversation: Seniors and Driving
This program examines the issue of older drivers, with thoughts from seniors (including folksinger Pete Seeger), traffic safety officials and eldercare experts about starting a conversation on if and when older drivers should give up the car keys.
Friday, April 29 at 3 pm ET

Pictured: Fishing boat at dock Last Boat Out
The Chesapeake Bay, once brimming with life and commerce, is dying… and it's not dying alone. It is taking with it a way of life for the thousands of watermen who have made their living on the bay for generations. It’s not too late to save them both. This documentary weaves two tales: the inspiring story of a family of Virginia watermen tirelessly trying to preserve their way of life on the Chesapeake Bay; the story of a bay battered by development and pollution struggling to stay alive.
Friday, April 29 at 5 pm ET

Pictured: Alison Stewart and Jon Meacham Need to Know
This weekly series is a cross-media news and public affairs magazine that culls stories from the best of the week’s online reporting, culminating in a one-hour on-air broadcast every Friday night. The program features documentary-style reports, short features, studio-based interviews and more. NEED TO KNOW covers five primary news beats: the economy; the environment and energy; health; national security; and culture. Alison Stewart and Jon Meacham co-anchor.
Friday, April 29 at 8:30 pm ET

Pictured: Sonia Reich Prisoner of Her Past
This special tells the story of a secret childhood trauma resurfacing, 60 years later, to unravel the life of Holocaust survivor Sonia Reich. The film follows her son, Chicago Tribune jazz critic Howard Reich, as he journeys across the United States and Eastern Europe to uncover why his mother believes the world is conspiring to kill her. Along the way, he finds a family he never knew he had. This film is the first to illuminate a little-known illness: late-onset Post Traumatic Stress Disorder. The documentary examines the disorder's devastating effect on families, but also shows programs that are aiding young trauma survivors of Hurricane Katrina, in New Orleans, and how such early interventions may have helped Howard's mother.
Friday, April 29 at 10 pm ET

Saturday

Pictured: Closeup of Gown and tassles
NMU Commencement
“Spring 2011”

Live coverage of Northern Michigan University’s spring commencement ceremonies. Speaker to be announced.
Saturday, April 30 at 10:30 am ET

Pictured: Media Meet program logo Media Meet
“Race and Education”

Northern Michigan University educators discuss the impact of race relations and ethnicity on education and vice versa, increasing social diversity and related challenges in a struggling economy.
Saturday, April 30 at 6:30 pm ET

Pictured: program title graphic Beyond The Light Switch
“Part 2”

A decade into the 21st Century and America already faces a challenge equal to the mobilization of World War Two...the complete transformation of our entire electrical infrastructure. So what is the right way forward? Coal? Natural gas? Renewables? Nuclear? Or a super grid? Which gives us the most bang for our buck? Which path achieves all our goals while creating jobs and gaining a measure of energy security? This 2-part series explores the available alternatives.
Saturday, April 30 at 8 pm ET

Pictured: Alejandro Escovedo Austin City Limits
“Alejandro Escovedo/Trombone Shorty”

AUSTIN CITY LIMITS continues its longstanding tradition of showcasing the best of American music. This week, rock and funk collide with Alejandro Escovedo and Trombone Shorty. Escovedo blasts out cuts from his LP Street Songs of Love. Trombone Shorty follows with a heavy dose of New Orleans funk 'n' roll.
Saturday, April 30 at 11 pm ET

The complete schedule for Public TV 13, Channel 13.1 is available on one page at this link.

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